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First Aid Tips in the Wilderness With the Use of a First Aid Kit

Posted on May 2, 2018 in Uncategorized

Accidents happen all the time. They happen everywhere, to everyone. While having fun like the time I was at a party and a friend slipped on some wet tile busting her chin wide open. Even when things feel like nothing can go wrong a mishap and some bad luck can amount to an emergency event.

Emergencies that need first aid are challenges when people around know first aid and have a first aid kit nearby.

Without those saviors, the same situation can be a helpless nightmare.

It is critical that you not only know basic first aid but that you also have a kit that is well stocked in your home, office, backpack, and car. It can be the difference between life and death. If not all that then the bill is certainly better than a visit to the doctor or hospital.

In fact, just the other day my wife cut her hand deep in the kitchen. I step in with the first aid kit and a few days later you can barely see a mark. This

would have been a $500 trip to the hospital and a risk of her getting something worse with an open wound there.

I am not saying to avoid the care of physicians. If you ever think that a doctor can help then GO! Do not EVER attempt to do ANYTHING that you are not 100% SURE will not do harm or make anything worse.

  • When a person breaks or dislocates their arm, a simple sling and a stick can become a sling to immobilize the arm and reduce the strain on it. That will buy you time to get to help.
  • A venomous snakebite is one of the worst things that happens on a camping trip. There are really cool snake bite care kits that will help keep a person stable while seeking medical treatment. Another aid in this situation is to have a local animal identification guide with nice pictures in it. If you can ID the type of snake then you will better know how to go ahead.
  • You should not ever attempt to suck out the poison from a snakebite. If you know what you are doing and have been trained to do this then it is whatever you and the bite victim decide. I really suggest that you get a snake bite kit and carry it (even if you do know how to suck venom which is very dangerous except in the movies).
  • Winter weather bring the threat of hypothermia in many locations. Even in the Summer, some locations can get very cold at night. first, know where the heck you are going and read about its average and extreme temperatures, including the wind chill factors for that time of year. If it gets cold where you are heading bring plenty of layers of clothing sleeping bags or at least some emergency blankets. Stay dry at all costs if you are getting cold. Make a fire ASAP and stick near it till the sun comes out to warm you up again. If you are in a wet place then keep a set of clothing dry and change into it after getting your shelter, fire and water situation squared away.
  • Everyone gets minor cuts are scrapes when hiking in the great outdoors. This in not a problem most of the time. Your cut it is a perfect breeding ground for all kinds of nasty organisms. Best to clean and over the cut to stay on the safe side.
  • Splinters can be easily removed with a pair of tweezers and some good hands free lighting. The head lamp is a must item for me because if I can’t see, I can’t help. The tweezers that I carry have a magnifying glass attached to them making the setup portable and simple to use.

These are just a few examples of situations that can be minor bumps in the road if you have the proper training and gear. There is no better time than now to get started and Learn to Last!